The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

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The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 2 1480x737

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 1 1480x913

The post The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle appeared first on Silodrome.

Posted in Uncategorized |

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 2 1480x737

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 1 1480x913

The post The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle appeared first on Silodrome.

Posted in Uncategorized |

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 2 1480x737

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 1 1480x913

The post The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle appeared first on Silodrome.

Posted in Uncategorized |

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 2 1480x737

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 1 1480x913

The post The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle appeared first on Silodrome.

Posted in Uncategorized |

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle

The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle is essentially a french press designed to purify unreliable water into clean, safe drinking water.

The filtration element uses electroabsorption, ultra-powdered activated carbon, and silver-treated zeolites to filter out 99.9999% of all viruses, bacteria, and protozoan cysts. It’s also effective at removing particulates like silt, sediment and heavy metals, and it removes most chemicals like chlorine and benzene.

The bottle uses BPA free construction, and the replaceable cartridge filter is effective for 300 uses, about 40 gal/150 L of water. The bottle has a capacity of 16 oz (473 ml), and Grayl offer a 10 year warranty on each unit.

Buy Here

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 2 1480x737

Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle 1 1480x913

The post The Grayl Ultralight Purification Bottle appeared first on Silodrome.

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Vibrazioni Ducati 749 Raticosa

Vibrazioni Ducati 749 Raticosa

Meet Vibrazioni Art Design

The Ducati 749 you see here is the work of Vibrazioni Art Design, a boutique design house started by Alberto Dassasso and Riccardo Zanobini – two Italians with a penchant for recycling old oil barrels into handmade furniture and occasionally handbuilt motorcycles.

We’ve previously featured a Vibrazioni-built Honda CB750 and a Ducati Scrambler, you can always tell a Vibrazioni custom from half a city block away due to their unique metalwork, characterised by the iconic original oil company logos preserved on old 44 gallon drums.

The Ducati 749

Ducati released the 749 in 2003 as a replacement for the ageing 748, both bikes had slightly smaller capacity engines based on their larger Ducati stablemates, in the case of the 748 it was the 916 and the 749 was based on the 999.

Once of the benefits of the smaller capacity engine is the fact that it revs up faster and has a higher red line, thanks in large part to the smaller, lighter pistons and reduced rotating mass. Many Ducatista will tell you the 749 handles better than the 999 too – although this is difficult to explain give the exceedingly similar kerb weights and designs of both bikes.

With its Pierre Terblanche designed good-looks, its 748cc L-twin with 8 Desmodromic valves, 116 bhp, 60 lbf.ft of torque, and a dry weight of 188 kilograms (414 lbs) the 749 proved to be a popular and affordable entry point to the world of Ducati superbikes.

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The Vibrazioni Ducati 749 Raticosa

When Vibrazioni got their hands on a Ducati 749 it was always going to result in something a little unusual. As an Italian design house the team at Vibrazioni have a special connection with their fellow countrymen at Ducati, though their interpretation is unlike anything you’re likely to see rolling out of the official factory in Bologna.

Far from being just a cosmetic make over, the Vibrazioni team modified the main trellis frame and the sub-frame, they swapped out the original forks for a set from a Ducati Streetfighter, the swing arm was sourced from a Ducati 1098, and the handlebars came from a Multistrada.

That fuel tank may look familiar – it started life as a stock Ducati Scrambler tank before being modified significantly using parts from recycled Sunoco oil drums. The seat and rear bodywork has been shaped from the same Sunoco drum into a flat track style seat, with a matching headlight and vented shield up front.

The new exhaust was also made in house, and fitted with a shorty muffler that does a great job of barely restraining the distinctive burble from the Ducati L-twin. The completed bike is unmistakably both a Ducati and a Vibrazioni, with a healthy heaping of irreverent flat tracker styling thrown in for good measure.

The team at Vibrazioni make a relatively limited number of bikes, their other focus being industrial-style furniture with a similar design ethos. Even those of you who typically have little interest in furniture design might find you quite like their work – it’s certainly not the sort of thing you’d ever find for sale in Bed, Bath, and Beyond.

If you’d like to see more from Vibrazioni Art Design you can click here to see their back catalogue of bikes.

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Saint Model 3014 Technical Denim Jacket

Saint Model 3014 Technical Denim Jacket

The Saint Model 3014 Technical Denim Jacket is designed for motorcyclists who want to stay safe, but not look like a Power Ranger. The Model 3014 is made from Dyneema interwoven with denim, making it tough, lightweight, and breathable. Saint uses Dyneema UHMWPE fibers, which are stronger than steel yet float on water.

Each Model 3014 Jacket is made from 12% Dyneema (UHMWPE) and 88% cotton, they have an engineered and tailored cut, and they’re 12 bath indigo dyed. Each jacket has four front pockets and zippered cuffs, with a button down collar and waist. Saint have rapidly developed a reputation for making some of the most technically advanced motorcycle gear in the world, with the added benefit of looking like regular street clothes.

Buy Here

Saint Model 3014 Technical Denim Jacket 1

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Short Film: The Black Falcon

Short Film: The Black Falcon

The Black Falcon is a custom motorcycle built by Ian Barry and his team at Falcon Motorcycles in Los Angeles, it’s one of the most highly-respected and detailed custom bikes of the modern era – and the fact that it’s powered by a 1950 Vincent Black Shadow V-twin only adds to its appeal.

This film offers a look into the remarkable functionality built into the Black Falcon, features that still images never quite capture effectively. Besides all of its built-in mechanisms, it also happens to be one of the most beautiful customs of the modern age – certainly in my humble opinion.

Official Summary

The Black Falcon is the most revered custom motorcycle in recent history. Designed by Ian Barry and built with his crew at Falcon Motorcycles in Los Angeles, the Black Falcon is more than a motorcycle; it’s a collection of ideas filling a motorcycle’s 3 dimensional space, challenging our definitions of both ‘art’ and ‘motorcycle’. It is simply magnificent.

What’s never been seen, though, is the remarkable functionality designed into the Black. It can be converted from full-race to touring mode without any tools, via Ian Barry’s ingenious designs for adjusting the handlebars, footrests, fuel tanks, seat, forks, and rear subframe.

This film corrects what has not previously been visible; all the hand-made, Ian Barry-designed tricks built in.

Via The Vintagent

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Only One Ever Made: 1989 Ferrari 328 Conciso

Only One Ever Made: 1989 Ferrari 328 Conciso

The Ferrari 328 Conciso is a bespoke one-off car built on the platform of the Ferrari 328 GTS. The new body was entirely shaped in aluminum alloy over a tubular steel frame to a design penned by famous German coachbuilder Bernd Michalak, his hope being that Ferrari could be convinced to produce a limited run of Concisos using the pre-existing Ferrari 328 architecture.

The production run never came to pass, but the Conciso made a huge impact when it was first shown to the public in 1993 at the Frankfurt Motor Show – and the fact that it’s 100% functional and road legal gives an indiction of just how in-depth the project was.

A Brief History of the Ferrari 328

The Ferrari 328 GTB (coupe) and GTS (targa) was introduced in 1985 as a replacement for the 308 – the new model was closely based on the outgoing 308, so much so that people often get confused between the two.

Ferrari have a long history of using numbers derived from the engine to determine the model name, and the 328 was no different. It’s powered by a mid-mounted 3.2 litre V8 (3.2 8), its capacity increased over the 3.0 litre V8 (3.0 8) in its predecessor.

The Ferrari 328 used an updated version of the tubular steel frame from the 308, with steel body panels that were still largely shaped by hand by Scaglietti. The engine is a transversely mounted DOHC (per bank) alloy V8, with Bosch K-Jetronic mechanical injection, Marelli Microplex electronic ignition, a 9.8:1 compression ratio, and 270 hp / 304 Nm of torque. This engine was mated to a 5-speed transmission with a single plate clutch, and the car has rack and pinion steering.

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Front and rear suspension is independent, with unequal-length wishbones, coil springs over telescopic shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars at both ends. Ferrari experts regard the 328 GTB/GTS as one of the best models to own due to its refinement, reliability, and the fact that major services can be done to the engine without removing it from the car – a significant cost saver.

A Brief History of the Ferrari 328 Conciso

The Conciso was a passion project for German designer Bernd Michalak, he developed it in 1993 as a “sport-barquette” version of the 328, with uncompromising styling and a kerb weight 30% lower than its production car donor.

Working out of the Bernd Michalak Design Studio, a highly-respected company in the field of prototype development, Bernd and his team drafted an uncompromising car with alloy bodywork, no roof, no doors, and a minimal windscreen.

The front and rear bodywork has a clam shell design, and occupants enter/exit the Conciso by stepping over the side bodywork. There are recesses in the internal sides of the cockpit for crash helmets, which you would probably want to wear as the car has no roll bar.

The Conciso currently has under 10,000 kms on the odometer, and it’s been owned by passionate collectors its entire life – the most recent of whom kept it in his living room on display.

Bonhams will be offering the Conciso at the Chantilly Sale on the 10th of September, and it’s being offered without reserve. If you’d like to read more about it or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

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1967 Alfa Romeo Sprint GT Veloce

1967 Alfa Romeo Sprint GT Veloce

Among the Alfa Romeo cognoscenti there are few cars as scared as the Giorgetto Giugiaro designed “step nose” 105 series coupes of the mid-1960s. They get their nickname from the 1/4 inch gap between the leading edge of the hood and the nose, in Italy they call it the “scalino”, which translates literally to “step”.

A Brief History of the Alfa Romeo Sprint GT Veloce

Giugiaro designed the svelte body and Alfa Romeo created a shortened version of the platform used on the four-door Giulia saloon. It was fitted with the legendary “Bialbero” Alfa Romeo Twin Cam engine, an all-aluminum alloy unit with double overhead cams, a cross-flow head, and two valves per cylinder. Over the course of its remarkably long 1954 to 1994 service life, the Bialbero would be fitted to a huge variety of Alfa Romeo vehicles, its size would range from 896cc through to 2.0 litres, and its horsepower figures would range from 52 to over 220 depending on configuration.

1965 would see the introduction of the Alfa Romeo Sprint GT Veloce, an incremental upgrade over the Alfa Romeo Sprint GT that first hit showrooms in 1963. In Italian the word “veloce” means “speed”, it was chosen as the model suffix as a hat tip to the upgraded Twin Cam Bialbero, which now produced a little more power and a lot more torque.

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A 5-speed manual gearbox came as standard, sending power back to a a beam axle with coil springs, and a limited slip rear differential was (and still is) a popular upgrade. Front suspension is independent with coil springs and there are disc brakes on all four wheels – giving the 105 series cars solid stopping power by 1960s standards.

In 1967 the Sprint GT Veloce was replaced with the 1750 GT Veloce, the new model had a Twin Cam that was upgraded to 1779cc, and produced 120 hp up from 108 hp on its predecessor. Perhaps the most obvious design changes were the switch to four headlights from the original two, and the loss of the step nose front end – a design feature that became remarkably popular despite its unusual nature.

The Upgraded Alfa Romeo Sprint GT Veloce Shown Here

The concept of taking classic cars and sympathetically upgrading them to significantly improve performance isn’t new, but the work of companies like Singer Vehicle Design have certainly brought it into the mainstream.

The Alfa you see here was built by the specialists at Blankemeijer by a Dutch classic rally enthusiast who wanted a bespoke and highly competitive road rally car. A corrosion-free ex-Arizona ’67 Guilia Sprint GT Veloce was sourced by the team at Blankemeijer – and the work began.

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The donor car was taken down to a bare metal shell, some GTA body modifications were made and it was then repainted in Alfa Rosso 501. A fast-road 2 litre Twin Cam engine was built by the team at Van Giersbergen and now produces 160 bhp and 154 lbf.ft of torque – a huge step up from the factory original.

Power was increased thanks to the use of 84 mm Cosworth pistons & liners, a flowed cylinder head with new valves and guides, optimized valve shape with sharpened and shortened guides, a 3 angle valve job, Catcam Camshafts, a hardened crankshaft, a 123-tune/ programable electrical ignition, twin Dellorto DHLA 40 carburetors, a Pipercross air-intake system, a full stainless header and exhaust system, and a high capacity radiator to keep it all running cool.

This engine was mated to a new gearbox with a hydraulic clutch, which was paired with a limited slip differential, and the suspension was rebuilt with Alfaholics Fast Road springs, Bilstein dampers, an upgraded sway bar, GTA-type adjustable top suspension arms, and a set of Alfaholics 15×7 Superleggera Veloce GTA wheels.

The completed car is one of the most fun-looking Alfas we’ve seen in quite some time, and it’s being offered for sale at a price that’s less than the cost of buying a car and getting all the work done yourself. If you’d like to read more about it or enquire into buying it you can click here to visit its listing on Image Street Classics.

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Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook

Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook

The Rado HyperChrome Captain Cook is a modern reissue of one of the Swiss company’s popular dive watches from 1962. They offer the new watch in both 37 millimeter and 45 millimeter sizes – the former is the original size and the latter is a for those with larger wrists, or those who prefer a larger timepiece.

With its simple, clear face and subtle retro cues the HyperChrome Captain Cook has already received accolades from the watch collecting world. It’s fitted with the automatic C07.611 Swiss movement with an 80 hour power reserved and the men’s version comes with your choice of three strap designs.

More Here

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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy

1965 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy

The release of the Ferrari 275 in 1964 was a significant milestone for Ferrari, it was the first of their cars to be fitted with a transaxle for improved weight distribution, and when coupled to its independent double wishbone front and rear suspension, the 275 was a generational shift forwards.

The changes under the skin were important of course, but most people buy cars with their eyes not their brains – so the new model was cloaked in an almost impossibly svelte, shark like body that must have been a revelation when it was first seen in the mid-1960s.

The Ferrari 275 GTB

The Ferrari 275 series made their first public appearance at the 1964 Paris Salon as a major evolution of the 250 series that had come before it. Rather than starting from a blank slate, Ferrari took the best elements of the 250 series cars and rolled them into the new model – with a series of improvements to make the new cars handle better and most importantly, go faster.

Perhaps the single biggest change was the addition of the transaxle – for the uninitiated a transaxle is a transmission with a built in differential, oftentimes installed in the location a traditional rear differential would be located, sending torque out sideways to both rear wheels. When used on cars like the 275 GTB it shifts the weight of the transmission backwards, improving weight distribution and improving handling.

In the cutaway image below, you can see the transaxle casing mounted equidistant between the rear wheels.

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Both steel and aluminum alloy bodied Ferrari 275 GTBs were made, the latter was considerably more expensive but it boasted a lower, more sporting kerb weight. Early cars were retroactively named “short-nose” and 1965 and later cars were nicknamed “long-nose” as a reference to the longer front end given to the later vehicles to combat the aerodynamic lift that was generated by the styling of the front end on the originals.

From an engineering standpoint there are certain inherent challenges with transaxles, the major one being that you need to get the power from the crankshaft in the engine back to the transaxle, then out to the rear wheels – without changing alignment. This alignment issue reared its head on the early cars but modifications where made – resolving the issue and making the transaxle one of the keys to the 275 GTBs successes on track.

From 1964 till 1966 the 275 GTB was fitted with the tried and tested Colombo 60° V12 engine in 3.3 litre (bore/stroke 77 x 58.8 mm) configuration – 275cc per cylinder. These engines produced 280 to 300 hp depending on whether they had three or six 40 Weber DCN/3 carburettors fitted, and they had a single overhead cam per bank.

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1966 saw the introduction of the significantly updated Ferrari 275 GTB/4 – that “4” tacked on the model designation hinted at the newly revised engine, now fitted with a four cams (a double overhead cam per bank), with reworked valves, and now the six 40 Weber DCN/3 carburettors were the only option.

Ferrari would replace the 275 GTB/4 with the 365 GTB/4 Daytona in 1968 – but it kept the transaxle, the double wishbones on all four corners with coil springs, and the torque tube – all used on its predecessor with much success.

The Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Shown Here

The Ferrari 275 GTB/6C you see here is one of the exceedingly rare alloy bodied examples – much sought after by collectors. It’s also a six carburetor version, and it benefits from a comprehensive restoration with Ferrari Classiche certification.

The model name’s “6C” suffix indicates that the car was fitted with six 40 Weber DCN/3 carburettors from the factory, and the “C” stands for Competizione – due to the vehicle’s lightweight alloy body, Competizione versions like this were used extensively in racing, both in Europe and in North America.

If you’d like to read more about this car or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing, it’s due to roll across the auction block with RM Sotheby’s between the 18th and 19th of August in Monterey, and the estimated value is between $2,900,000 and $3,000,000 USD.

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Photo Credits: Juan Rivas ©2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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When Sex Was Safe

When Sex Was Safe

Sir Jackie Stewart once famously said “When I was in Formula One, sex was safe and motor racing was dangerous” – funnily enough it was Stewart himself who was largely responsible for many of the safety advances made in motor racing during his time as a driver and later as a team owner.

The new book “When Sex Was Safe” paraphrases Sir Jackie in the title as a hat tip to his impact on racing. The book is a collection of stories and remarkable artwork by the team at Unique & Limited, offering a look back at some iconic moments in racing history with expansive images and entertaining writing.

Buy Here

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The Last American De Tomaso Pantera

The Last American De Tomaso Pantera

It’s been said that there are two kinds of men in the world – those who like Panteras and those who aren’t real men. Nothing about this car was even remotely effeminate, and that’s exactly how the company’s red blooded Argentinian founder Alejandro de Tomaso intended it.

Alejandro was no shrinking violet, he came from a good Argentinian cattle farming family with Italian heritage, and as a young man he’d (allegedly) been part of a coup plot against Juan Perón, the then Argentinian president. Once his involvement was known he’d had to flee Argentina under cover of night, and made his way to Italy where he took up the altogether less stressful occupation of being a racing car driver.

Once settled in Modena he married a Elizabeth Haskell, a wealthy American heiress, and Italianised his name to Alessandro. After racing Ferraris, Maseratis, Coopers, and OSCAs he retired as a driver and immediately began building racing cars – utilizing the knowledge he’d gained as a driver.

A Brief History of the De Tomaso Pantera

The early De Tomaso road cars included the Vallelunga and Mangusta, and in 1971 the company branched out into luxury four door saloons with the De Tomaso Deauville – but the car the company is always best remembered for is the Pantera – a mighty V8-engined supercar designed to compete with the best from Ferrari and Lamborghini, but at half the MSRP.

Pantera is Italian for “panther”, perhaps an indication of the vehicle’s sporting intent. Rather than using the steel backbone chassis as they had on earlier models, the new Pantera had a steel unibody – a design feature that helped reduce weight and increase rigidity. The eye-catching styling was done by American Tom Tjaarda who was then working at the Italian design firm Ghia.

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An agreement was reached with Ford to sell Panteras off the showroom floor of Lincoln Mercury dealers in the USA – this was a huge boost to De Tomaso, resulting in thousands of sales they might not otherwise have enjoyed. It also gave the dealerships a halo car that would get people through the door, many of whom then left in a less exotic four-door car with either a Lincoln or Mercury badge on the hood.

Under the skin the Pantera was an advanced design for the day, it featured a mid-mounted Ford V8, a 5-speed ZF transaxle, power-assisted four-wheel disc brakes, rack and pinion steering, air-conditioning, independent front and rear suspension, and lightweight magnesium wheels.

There first series of Panteras were built from 1971 to halfway through 1972, when the upgraded Pantera L was introduced – that L stood for “Lusso”, the Italian word for “Luxury”. This new model had a black front bumper fitted to reduce lift at high speeds and meet new government regulations, it also incorporated a slew of upgrades and improvements, making it as good or better than many of its Italian contemporaries.

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1974 would see the introduction of the Pantera GTS, with all chrome blacked out and new fender flares – this was the most aggressive looking of the early Panteras and it’s the car many see in their mind’s eye when they think of the model. All the early Panteras were fitted with Ford 351 Cleveland engines, though the power output steadily declined due to emissions restrictions – as was the case with many American built and imported vehicles in the early to mid-1970s. In the years since, many owners have worked to claw all of this power back and add some more through engine modifications and performance improvements.

Ford stopped importing the Pantera after 1974, new regulations would have required the car be redesigned from scratch, which was never going to be cost effective. De Tomaso kept selling them in Europe and other world markets until 1996, a total of approximately 7260 were produced and they now offer excellent value to those looking for a vintage Italian supercar with a lower sticker price and vastly reduced maintenance costs.

The 1974 De Tomaso Pantera L Shown Here

The Pantera you see here is the last one ever built for the American market, its provenance is commemorated with a brass plaque on the passenger side dashboard and amazingly it still has less than 17,000 miles on the odometer.

It was ordered by passionate Ford collector Floyd Moore, he chose Pantera Orange paint and took excellent care of his new Italian car, as is evidenced by its fantastic original condition throughout.

Today the car is well-known within the Pantera community and is likely to attract plenty of attention when it sells though RM Sotheby’s between the 18th and 19th of August with an estimated hammer price of between $125,000 and $175,000 USD. If you’d like to read more about the car or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

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Photo Credits: Drew Shipley ©2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

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Film – Raymond Loewy: Father of Industrial Design

Film – Raymond Loewy: Father of Industrial Design

Raymond Loewy is know as the father of industrial design, and for good reason, he designed everything from Air Force One, to the Shell logo, to Skylab – and a thousand other things besides.

This film offers a candid glimpse into Loewy’s personal home, including a visit to a local hardware store where he offers his admiration and criticism in equal measure to the sundry items on sale.

Remarkably, Loewy would remain an active designer for 71 years from 1908 till 1980. The overwhelming majority of his design career took place in the United States where he became a naturalized citizen in 1938. Loewy still enjoyed spending time in his native France and later in his life he kept a house in California and another in France, allowing him to move between his two favorite countries at will.

His Wikipedia page includes a fascinating list of all his designs which is well worth a visit, it’s remarkable just how much of an impact the softly spoken French immigrant had on 20th century American life.

Film credit goes to the Internet Archive.

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Via Core77

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1940 BMW 328 Roadster

1940 BMW 328 Roadster

The 1940 BMW 328 Roadster shown here presents a bit of an automotive mystery, its rare Touring of Milan bodywork was constructed using the Superleggera (super lightweight) method with a design in keeping with the Auto Avio Costruzioni sports racer – Enzo Ferrari’s first foray into car construction.

These factors likely mean the car you see here was one of the first special Touring bodied cars built for BMW, it’s thought that just five or six prototype 328 BMW-chassis cars were constructed by Touring of Milan in early 1939 before the outbreak of WWII.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BMW 328

It’s difficult to overstate just how important the BMW 328 was in the 1930s, it’s a car that put BMW at the very top of the sports car world in Europe in the mid to late 1930s, and its influence on sports car engineering and design continued well into the 1950s if not beyond.

The secret to the success of the 328 was down to two major factors – weight and power. The designers Rudolf Schleicher and Fritz Fiedler created a lightweight tubular frame with two longitudinal tubes that had an A-frame shape when viewed from above – the rear being wider than the front. This allowed the independent front suspension to be fitted, and accommodated the live axle leaf spring rear.

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Schleicher and Fiedler developed a lightweight alloy body for the 328 with excellent aerodynamic characteristics for the era, made all the more impressive by the fact they didn’t have access to a wind tunnel.

The engine used in the BMW 328 is famous for catching people out at car shows, it looks a lot like a twin cam straight 6, however its actually a pushrod unit with steeply angled valves and hemispherical combustion chambers.

A set of triple Solex 30 JF downdraft carburetors were installed between the valve covers and the exhaust exits out the right side into twin sets of 3-into-1 headers. Power wasn’t outrageous but 80 hp from 2 liters was a solid output for the era – and the car only weighed 780 kilograms (1719 lbs) in race trim or 830 kilograms (1829 lbs) in road trim.

The 1940 BMW 328 Roadster Shown Here

The car shown here has had a fascinating life, the body was removed and fitted to a Simca chassis in the 1950s for parts supply reasons, but it was reunited with the BMW 328 chassis in the 1990s – reuniting the body, chassis, and engine for the first time in decades.

The comprehensive restoration didn’t begin until the 2000s, when it was entrusted to highly-regarded Chicago-area restoration expert Fran Roxas and his team. During the restoration it was discovered that this car was one of the seven equipped with a dry-sump engine, adding further to its desirability.

The sweeping aluminum alloy bodywork is made possible in part by the Superleggera structure – essentially a frame of steel tubes onto which thin gauge aluminum panels are attached. The most famous Superleggera bodies are probably those fitted to some of the DB series Aston Martins and some of the early Ferraris including the 166, 195, and 212.

Worldwide Auctioneers will be offering the 328 Touring Roadster at the Pacific Grove Auction on the 17th of August, it has an estimated value of between $1,500,000 and $2,000,000 USD and you can click here if you’d like to read more about it or register to bid.

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Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island is a fascinating look at one of the most fascinating motorcycles of the 1990s – the Britten V1000. The film is 8 minutes long, and provides a wonderful look back at an often overlooked piece of motorcycle history.

Official Description

The Isle of Man TT is, without doubt, the most dangerous race on the planet. In a similar vein to the World’s Fastest Indian at Bonneville in the 1960s, in 1994 New Zealand inventor John Britten and his team brought their futuristic racing motorcycle to this infamous race.

John Britten turned motorcycle design on its head in the early 1990s with the Britten V1000; a hand-built motorcycle designed and constructed by a small group of friends in John’s backyard shed in Christchurch. The motorcycle incorporated technologies seldom seen before: extensive use of carbon fibre, the radiator located under the seat, double wishbone front suspension, frameless chassis and engine data logging.

At the height of their endeavours the Britten team took three V1000 racers to the 1994 Isle of Man TT races. There they were confronted by the dark side of the world’s most famous and dangerous race track.

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Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island is a fascinating look at one of the most fascinating motorcycles of the 1990s – the Britten V1000. The film is 8 minutes long, and provides a wonderful look back at an often overlooked piece of motorcycle history.

Official Description

The Isle of Man TT is, without doubt, the most dangerous race on the planet. In a similar vein to the World’s Fastest Indian at Bonneville in the 1960s, in 1994 New Zealand inventor John Britten and his team brought their futuristic racing motorcycle to this infamous race.

John Britten turned motorcycle design on its head in the early 1990s with the Britten V1000; a hand-built motorcycle designed and constructed by a small group of friends in John’s backyard shed in Christchurch. The motorcycle incorporated technologies seldom seen before: extensive use of carbon fibre, the radiator located under the seat, double wishbone front suspension, frameless chassis and engine data logging.

At the height of their endeavours the Britten team took three V1000 racers to the 1994 Isle of Man TT races. There they were confronted by the dark side of the world’s most famous and dangerous race track.

John Britten V1000 1480x987 - Britten - Return to The Island

The post Britten – Return to The Island appeared first on Silodrome.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island

Britten – Return to The Island is a fascinating look at one of the most fascinating motorcycles of the 1990s – the Britten V1000. The film is 8 minutes long, and provides a wonderful look back at an often overlooked piece of motorcycle history.

Official Description

The Isle of Man TT is, without doubt, the most dangerous race on the planet. In a similar vein to the World’s Fastest Indian at Bonneville in the 1960s, in 1994 New Zealand inventor John Britten and his team brought their futuristic racing motorcycle to this infamous race.

John Britten turned motorcycle design on its head in the early 1990s with the Britten V1000; a hand-built motorcycle designed and constructed by a small group of friends in John’s backyard shed in Christchurch. The motorcycle incorporated technologies seldom seen before: extensive use of carbon fibre, the radiator located under the seat, double wishbone front suspension, frameless chassis and engine data logging.

At the height of their endeavours the Britten team took three V1000 racers to the 1994 Isle of Man TT races. There they were confronted by the dark side of the world’s most famous and dangerous race track.

John Britten V1000 1480x987 - Britten - Return to The Island

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Posted in Uncategorized |